Bell Trail Petroglyphs

Went on a hike with a group from work. Me and another staff took the wrong trail and ended up seeing these amazing petroglyphs, ruins and pottery. Glad we got lost LOL. So at the sign about three miles in… go to the right. If you go to the left you will end up at a really awesome swimming hole called “The Crack.”

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Rock Art Ranch ~ Arizona Ancestral History Tour

We recently had the opportunity to stay at the Rock Art Ranch in Joseph City near Winslow Arizona. Brantly Barid and family were amazingly loving and humble hosts. I didn’t want to leave! So many awesome things to see… the museum, the kivas and pit houses, Chevelon canyon with some of the most amazing petroglyphs I have ever seen, old hogans, pottery, arrowheads, mind blowing sunsets and an abundance of wildlife. This is a history lovers paradise! Such a peaceful place to be. Enjoy…
Contact Info: 928.288.3260 Facebook TripAdvisor

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Hopi Ceremonial Kiva at Mesa Verde

kiva at Spuce Tree House in Mesa VerdeThis magical photograph was taken down inside the Kiva here at Mesa Verde National Park. It is a panorama of 8 images. TI wanted to convey a sense of Spiritual awareness with the Ancestral Puebloans ( Anasazi ). The shadows and light coming down from the world above invokes a sense of timelessness. One almost expects to see the Elders gathered here. This photograph was taken in late August of 2012, ( Spruce Tree House ).

kiva is a room used by modern Puebloans for religious rituals, many of them associated with the kachina belief system. Among the modern Hopi and most other Pueblo peoples, kivas are square-walled and underground, and are used for spiritual ceremonies.

Similar subterranean rooms are found among ruins in the American southwest, indicating ritual or cultural use by the ancient peoples of the region including the Ancient Pueblo Peoples, the Mogollon and the Hohokam. Those used by the ancient Pueblos of the Pueblo I Era and following, designated by the Pecos Classification system developed by archaeologists, were usually round, and generally believed to have been used for religious and other communal purposes.

When designating an ancient room as a kiva, archaeologists make assumptions about the room’s original functions and how those functions may be similar to or differ from kivas used in modern practice. The kachina belief system appears to have emerged in the Southwest at approximately AD 1250, while kiva-like structures occurred much earlier. This suggests that the room’s older functions may have been changed or adapted to suit the new religious practice.

As cultural changes occurred, particularly during the Pueblo III period between 1150 and 1300, kivas continued to have a prominent place in the community. However, some kivas were built above ground. Kiva architecture became more elaborate, with tower kivas and great kivas incorporating specialized floor features. For example, kivas found in Mesa Verde were generally keyhole-shaped. In most larger communities, it was normal to find one kiva for each five or six rooms used as residences. Kiva destruction, primarily by burning, has been seen as a strong archaeological indicator of conflict and warfare among people of the Southwest during this period.

Fifteen top rooms encircle the central chamber of the vast Great Kiva at Aztec Ruins National Monument. The room’s “…purpose is unclear…. Each had an exterior doorway to the plaza…. Four massive pillars of alternating masonry and horizontal poles held up the ceiling beams, which in turn supported an estimated ninety-five-ton roof. Each pillar rested on four shaped stone disks, weighing about 355 pounds apiece. These discs are of limestone, which came from mountains at least forty miles away.” (A Trail Guide to Aztec Ruins, 4th printing:WNPA, 2004).

After 1325 or 1350, except in the Hopi and Pueblo region, the ratio changed from 60 to 90 rooms for each kiva. This may indicate a religious or organizational change within the society, perhaps affecting the status and number of clans among the Pueblo people. The use of the kiva was for men and boys only.

Resource: Wikipedia.org

Polatki and Honanki Ruins in Sedona

polatki and honanki nov 2015 (7)My adventure today… November 1 2015

The Palatki Heritage Site — in the Hopi language Palatki means ‘red house’– it is an archaeological site and park located in the Coconino National Forest, near Sedona, in Arizona.

The Honanki Heritage Site (meaning “bear house”) is approximately 4.5 miles north west of Polatki and is also a cliff dwelling and rock art site located in the Coconino National Forest, about 15 miles (24 km) west of Sedona, Arizona. The Sinagua people of the Ancient Pueblo Peoples, and ancestors of the Hopi people, lived here from about 1100 to 1300 CE.

Pictographs are a key feature of the site. Some of the pictographs were present before the caves were inhabited, dating to 2000 BCE. However, most of the pictographs are additions from the Sinagua peoples dating between 900 and 1300 CE.

Honanki was later inhabited by both Yavapai and Apache people. Pictographs dating between 1400 and 1875 CE can be attributed to these two groups.

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Shamans Cave Robbers Roost Sedona

Shamans Cave, also known as Robbers Roost,  is a very special place in Sedona that when visited, one should show great respect to land and the people that are meditating and doing ceremony there. It is believed to have been a place where the Shaman of the local tribe would have performed healing and ceremony. Also, it is said that when you meditate in the cave long enough, you can hear messages from your ancestors.

The cave is a very large room, approximately 20 feet long, 40 feet wide and 15 feet high, and open on one side. Inside, there’s a near-perfect, six-foot-wide circular window cut out of the thick rock that neatly frames the amazing view. There are two distinct sets of ruins within this rock formation. There are also several metate’s in the floor where the natives would have used to grind special herbs or corn for healing and prayer.

shamans cave robbers roost sedona

shamans cave sedona

shamans cave window

Walnut Canyon Tour Sedona Flagstaff Arizona

walnut canyon tour walkwayThis is an amazingly beautiful and quiet place. The people that use to call this place home some 800 years ago, knew what they were doing! From the visitor center it is approximately a one mile hike round trip to explore these incredible ruins. There are over 300 rooms counted in this canyon. Imagine the gentle breeze blowing through the tall pines and across your face as you watch a red-tail hawk glide by. This is a must see for the northern Arizona explorer.

 

Beasley Flats Cave Dwellings Camp Verde Arizona

native american cave dwellings at beasly flatsBeasly Flats is a historical location in Camp Verde along the Verde River. Many years ago an indigenous tribe, most likely the Hopi, lived here. There are many cave dwellings and several pithouses nearby. I actually grew up only a few miles from here where there is another similar set of caves and pithouse ruins. This area is loaded with Native American history. A beautiful place to meditate and have a picknick.

petroglyph rock at beasly flatsYou can see this petroglyph rock on your way to Beasley Fats. I’ve heard that this rock goes about 30 feet into the earth. DOT tried to remove it once and failed so they just left it near the road and put a guardrail around it. On one side it shows San Francisco Peaks looking in the direction of the peaks! The spirals are said to be a map of where they were and where they were going. History shows that the Hopi were migrating from the far south to eventually the Hopi Mesas where the now live today.

salt mine camp verde arizonaAlso along the way you will see an old salt mine. In the past this was a highly valued trade commodity.

Native American Caves at Beasley Flats

Beasly Flats Cave Dwellings

native american cave dwellings at beasly flatsBeasly Flats is a historical location in Camp Verde along the Verde River. Many years ago an indigenous tribe, most likely the Hopi, lived here. There are many cave dwellings and several pithouses nearby. I actually grew up only a few miles from here where there is another similar set of caves and pithouse ruins. This area is loaded with Native American history. A beautiful place to meditate and have a picknick.

petroglyph rock at beasly flatsYou can see this petroglyph rock on your way to Beasley Fats. I’ve heard that this rock goes about 30 feet into the earth. DOT tried to remove it once and failed so they just left it near the road and put a guardrail around it. On one side it shows San Francisco Peaks looking in the direction of the peaks! The spirals are said to be a map of where they were and where they were going. History shows that the Hopi were migrating from the far south to eventually the Hopi Mesas where the now live today.

salt mine camp verde arizonaAlso along the way you will see an old salt mine. In the past this was a highly valued trade commodity.

 

 

Mantezumas Well Ancient Ancestral Village

Montezumas well is located near Sedona Arizona and features well-preserved cliff-dwellings. They were built and used by the Pre-Columbian Sinagua people, northern cousins of the Hohokam, around 700 CE. It was occupied from approximately 1125-1400 CE, and occupation peaked around 1300 CE. The monument is not at all a castle, but remains to be named “Montezuma Castle”, despite it having nothing to do with Aztec Empire nor being named after any Montezuma emperors, such as Montezuma (spelled more properly “Moctezuma”). Many sites in North America are misnamed such as this site, because their discoverers were more interested in the discovery than information or understanding. Several Hopi clans trace their roots to immigrants from the Montezuma Castle/Beaver Creek area. Clan members periodically return to their former homes for religious ceremonies. When European Americans discovered them in the 1860s, they named them for the Aztec emperor (of Mexico) Montezuma, due to mistaken beliefs that the emperor had been connected to their construction. Neither part of the monument’s name is correct. The Sinaqua dwelling was abandoned 100 years before Montezuma was born and the Dwellings were not a castle. It was more like a “prehistoric high rise apartment complex”.

Montezuma Well is a natural sinkhole 368 feet wide measuring 70 feet from the water to the tops of the cliffs. Every day approximately 1.5 million gallons of warm (74°) water flows from the well. The Well is fed by three to four large underwater vents, some 56 feet below the surface. The water flows from the Well through a 300 foot long cave to emerge on the southeast side of the sinkhole mound. Here it is diverted into an ancient irrigation ditch built over 1,000 years ago by the Hohokam and Sinaguan Indians who farmed here for centuries.

Resources of information: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Montezuma_Castle_National_Monument and http://www.friends-of-the-well.org